Dealing with Withdrawal Symptoms from Opiates

Withdrawal Symptoms from Opiates. How To Cope

The country is in a frenzy right now dealing with a heroin and opiate painkiller epidemic.  Many addicts turn to seeking help only to find there is none available quick enough. So we will discuss a few different topics on dealing with withdrawal symptoms from opiates. Opiate addiction withdrawal isn’t easy and shouldn’t be taken lightly. The side effects of opiate withdrawal can prove troublesome to most, but it doesn’t last forever.

If you’re going through withdrawal from opiates, you should probably look towards seeking a detox for opiate withdrawal. Detox would be an easier way of dealing with withdrawal symptoms from opiates. However, many may not have the opportunity of treatment for opiate addiction. Instead, we will educate you as to what to use for opiate withdrawal. If you’re struggling, it’s important to note we can get you help.  Call 844-207-7772

What are the side effects of opiate withdrawal?If you’re going through withdrawal from opiates, you should probably look towards seeking a detox for opiate withdrawal. Detox would be an easier way of dealing with withdrawal symptoms from opiates. However, many may not have the opportunity of treatment for opiate addiction. Instead, we will educate you as to what to use for opiate withdrawal. If you’re struggling, it’s important to note we can get you help.

Some of the side effects of opiate withdrawal may vary, but we will provide you with the most common symptoms. We strongly suggest seeking a physician’s care during the side effects of opiate withdrawal.

In many cases withdrawal side effects may begin with 12-24 hours of your last use of opiates. Here is what happens:

  • Muscle Aches – If taken for a continual amount of time opiate seep into your bone marrow and they dry up the naturally produced fluid. This makes the joints and muscles in the body very achy during withdrawal from opiates. Bananas help a lot if you can even develop an appetite.
  • Restlessness – Many who are addicted to opiate pain killers or heroin have a lot of trouble sleeping. Restlessness from opiate withdrawal is not easy to overcome naturally, but you eventually get to sleep if you wait it out.
  • Teary Eyes – A lot of people who are struggling with opiate withdrawal suffer from teary eyes also known as lacrimation. Tylenol, Advil or Ibuprofen will clear this up a bit, but like many other opiate withdrawal symptoms you may have to let this run its course.
  • Runny Nose – The body has its own natural way of clearing itself of toxins. When you do opiates they run everywhere in your system. Your brain is literally leaking like a sponge to get rid of any unnatural toxins.
  • Anxiety – It’s extremely normal to become jittery once you have started to withdrawal many detoxes for opiates offer medication for this stage of detox, but if you detox alone it just a waiting game.
  • Sweating Excessively – It’s your body’s natural way of releasing toxins when you sweat. It is normal to go through this phase of withdrawal and should be welcomed. If you’re not going through this stage your body is holding back the toxins. In many cases this is because of a lack of fluids or your liver isn’t cleansing itself.
  • Excessive Yawning – Your body works real hard to push toxins out and Opiates deplete your natural flow of nutrients. Your body goes into overdrive when it’s fighting something off similar to a cold.

Detox Symptoms from Opiates After 24 Hours

Dealing with withdrawal symptoms from opiates 24 hours after your last use of pain killers or heroin. The side effects of opiate withdrawal get a bit worse during this phase. It wouldn’t be realistic to say that going through withdrawal from opiates gets easier within the first three days. I also suggest a medical detox if you can’t handle it. The side effects of opiate withdrawal can be unbearable for most people detoxing.

These are the side effects of opiate withdrawal you can expect after 24 hours:

  • Diarrhea – This often happens when the body is fighting anything from a virus to opiate withdrawal. If you’re going through withdrawal from opiates, you should probably look towards seeking a detox for opiate withdrawal. Detox would be an easier way of dealing with withdrawal symptoms from opiates. However, many may not have the opportunity of treatment for opiate addiction. Instead, we will educate you as to what to use for opiate withdrawal. If you’re struggling, it’s important to note we can get you help.It’s not uncommon for someone to take Imodium AD or some kind of stool hardener. However, this is your body’s natural way of ridding itself of all of the toxins.
  • Abdominal Cramping – With all of the chaos going on in your body at the time of withdrawal this must be accepted as normal. It’s like banging on your head with a hammer; of course you’re going to get a headache.
  • Goose Bumps – I am not exactly sure why this happens, but if I had to guess the opiates throw off your body’s natural thermostat; so it’s not uncommon for your body to perceive it’s cold with a temperature of 101.
  • Nausea or Vomiting – During withdrawal of opiates your body is at war with itself and these two withdrawal symptoms are not uncommon. The nausea can be from the abdominal pain and the vomiting from the body pushing out the toxins.
  • Dilated Pupils – Dilated pupils typically means you’re in full blown withdrawal. Many medical detox nurses look for this before they administer detox meds. Many detox medications for opiate withdrawal will have an adverse effect if your body isn’t in full blown withdrawal.
  • Rapid heartbeat – When you take opiates in any form like heroin or opiate painkillers they suppress your heartbeat. When you stop using opioids your heart tries to go back to normal, but it’s like starting an engine that hasn’t run in a while.
  • High Blood Pressure – This symptom only makes common sense with your body completely out of whack and your anxiety so high. However, in medical detox there is medication for this symptom.

Withdrawal Medication for Opiates

Many people who seek medical detox for opioids are typically better suited for dealing with withdrawal symptoms from opiates. Many detox centers for opioids offer withdrawal medication for opiates. The side effects of opiate withdrawal may require these withdrawal medications for opiates:

  • Clonidine for opiate withdrawal is quite common to be given in medical detox. Clonidine for opiate withdrawal is typically offered by the doctor for a myriad of withdrawal symptoms. The biggest reason for the clonidine is to combat high blood pressure, anxiety and elevated heartbeat.
  • Multi Vitamin for withdrawal is also quite common due to the malnutrition that occurs during the use of opiates or heroin. Taking these everyday while you’re prescribed opiate pain killers is also a great suggestion to avoid nutritional unbalance.
  • Subutex or Suboxone used during medical drug detox for heroin or opiates is the most common. Suboxone is a combination of Buprenorphine and an opiate blocker naloxone. Suboxone for opioid detox is very popular because it does not produce as many addictive effects of opiates. If injected it can cause instant withdrawal; Therefore it is less likely to be abused than other formulations. Suboxone also contains the ingredient naloxone which is the primary ingredient they use to reverse overdose from heroin and other opioids.
  • Methadone typically is used for long-term maintenance opioid abuse therapy. Methadone is an extremely powerful synthetic opioid and can be extremely addictive. However, some who are allergic to suboxone or any of its chemicals typically use methadone instead. If methadone is taken in a controlled manor then it works well for opiate addiction.
  • OTC Pain Relievers like Tylenol, Ibuprofen or Advil are typically standard for the aches and pains, but are only given out every few hours as needed.
Warning:

Suboxone for heroin or opiate withdrawal can be painful if ingested within 24 hours of your last use of heroin or painkillers. Taking Suboxone or any similar medications before you’re in full blown detox can put you into a rapid detox making your detoxification process even more uncomfortably painful then it was.

What is the Time Line for Opiate Withdrawal Length?

The time line for opiate withdrawal length detoxing is from 12 – 24 hours after your last use of opiates and you should be in full blown detox by 24 – 48 hours. The major withdrawal symptoms should dissipate by 3-4 days although you may still feel achy, have the sweats or chills and feel sluggish. After a 2 week time line for opiate withdrawal length you should start feeling normal, but you will have to deal with Post-Acute Withdrawal Symptoms for a few months after your last opiate.

Methadone Withdrawal Time Length

Methadone withdrawal length can take a lot more time and also be way more uncomfortable according to reports from people that’ve been through it.  According to reports by patients some lengths of time for methadone withdrawal can take up to 6 months. Some patients have reported a very tough withdrawal from Suboxone too, if taken for lengthy amounts of time. It’s very important to do your research on your prescribing physician before you attempt long term maintenance with Suboxone or Methadone.

Peter

I am a freelance writer, web developer, search engine optimization specialist, PPC specialist, social media strategist, and more. The drug and alcohol treatment industry pulls on my heart strings and I will only work with the best, That's why I work with Bright Futures Treatment Center